Tag Archives: Louis McKee

ReBound Series will open August 1

We’re looking forward to reading your nominations for the ReBound Series, which showcases out-of-print chapbooks in snazzy, new editions in order to bring them to a wider readership. This series depends on you, Dear Readers, so please take a moment to browse your bookshelves and let us know which out-of-print chapbooks you think deserve new life! The fall reading period is August 1 through September 15, and you can find full guidelines here.

 

April 29: Memorial Reading for Louis McKee: Philadelphia

 

Memorial Reading for Poet/Teacher Louis McKee
 
The Fox Chase Reading Series will hold a memorial reading in honor of Northeast Philadelphia Poet and Father Judge High School teacher Louis McKee. Mr. McKee passed away on November 21, 2012. The event will be held on April 29th, 1:30pm-3:30pm at Ryerss Museum and Library in Fox Chase, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Seventeen collections of McKee’s poetry were published over his lifetime. Father Judge Graduates, The Sun Bear Trio and Poet Steve Delia will open the event followed by the presentation of a Pennsylvania State Citation by State Representative Michael McGeehan in honor of Mr. McKee.The second half of the event will feature poets reading the poems of Louis McKee. Friends, Poets and former students are invited to join the memorial sharing memories of Mr. McKee. For more information please visit: Northeast Philadelphia Memorial for Poet/Teacher Louis McKee

Louis McKee Memorial Event: Sunday, March 18

(Originally posted by Eileen D’Angelo)
 
A great light has gone out of the Philadelphia literary community, and for many of us who loved Philadelphia teacher and poet Louis McKee. There will be a celebration of his remarkable life on Sunday, March 18th at 1 pm at the Mansion Parlor and Gallery of Media Borough Hall, 301 North Jackson Street, Media, PA 19063.  Please join us that day.

Remembrances, stories and memories will be shared by his friends including Daniel Hoffman, WD Ehrhart, Joe Farley, Harry Humes, Paul Martin, Ray Greenblatt, Thomas Devaney, Elaine Terranova, Steve Delia, Peter Krok, Dan Maguire, Lynn Levin, Barb Crooker, Richard Bank, Mel Brake, Eileen D’Angelo and many others. Everyone is invited to come and take to the podium, or rise from their seats, Quaker-style, as the spirit moves them, to share one of your favorite poems written by Lou, or tell a story, an anecdote or share a fond memory of our dear friend and Northeast Philadelphia’s native son. Please come and help us celebrate his life. Feel free to copy and forward this message. With your help, we can make it a very special day to remember him.

Mourning a Loss: Louis McKee, 1951-2011

We’re terribly saddened to just hear of the passing of Lou McKee, who died yesterday  (the very day his chapbook, No Matter, was re-released). I’m passing along this announcement by Eileen D’Angelo:

Dear Friends,  
   With a sad and heavy heart, I am writing to let you know that our friend and Philadelphia poet, Louis McKee, died yesterday, November 21st.
   A dear friend of so many of us on the Philadelphia poetry scene, Lou was most definitely one of its greatest voices. His passing is a great personal loss, as I know it is a great loss to us all. It is an understatement to say that he will be missed by many.
   Plans for a memorial service are underway. I will send additional news ASAP.
   Sincerely, Eileen
  
Louis McKee (born July 31, 1951, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) has been a fixture of the Philadelphia poetry scene since the early 70s. He is the author of Schuylkill County (Wampeter, 1982), The True Speed of Things (Slash & Burn, 1984), and fourteen other collections. More recently, he has published River Architecture: Poems from Here & There 1973-1993 (Cynic, 1999), Loose Change (Marsh River Editions, 2001), and a volume in the Pudding House Greatest Hits series. Gerald Stern has called his work “heart-breaking” and “necessary,” while William Stafford has written, “Louis McKee makes me think of how much fun it was to put your hand out a car window and make the air carry you into quick adventures and curlicues. He is so adept at turning all kinds of sudden glimpses into good patterns.” Naomi Shihab Nye says, “Louis McKee is one of the truest hearts and voices in poetry we will ever be lucky to know.”
Near Occasions of Sin, a collection issued in 2006 by Cynic Press, has been praised by Brendan Kennelly: “I really admire, and like, deeply, Louis McKee’s poems. They have two qualities I love – clarity and candour. And they often tell stories even as they evoke mysteries of being. And they engage a great deal with people. “The Soldier,” for example, is stunning for its pure drama. Then, he is a moving, complex love-poet, at once passionate and reserved. McKee’s poems are like flashes of spirit rooted in the body. He never hides behind, or in, obscurity. Near Occasions of Sin is utterly unpretentious because his genius (I think he has that) is so real; “I am content with this,” he says at the end of “Failed Haiku,” and this readiness to be himself, in all his complexity and simplicity, is, I think, the basis of the appeal of this most unusual and attractive book. Sometimes, McKee talks to his reader and it is like talking to a next-door neighbor (that’s what I mean by candour in these poems). Also, they sound like songs at times-winged, humane, vulnerable.”
 
Philip Dacey, writing about McKee’s poetry in Schuylkill Valley Journal (#24, spring, 2007) says, “It is the essence of McKee’s work to be rich in artifice and craftsmanship and informed poetic strategies while at the same time consistently brave in its presentation of two confrontations: a person’s with himself and that person’s with the world outside himself. To read McKee is to witness drama and struggle; if the art is hard-won, the human victories are, too.”
 
Warren Woessner, in the American Book Review (Jan/Feb 2007, Vol 28, No. 2), writes that McKee’s poems have a “surprising honesty…. In this era of superconfessional hubris, we are told that no topic is off-limits, but, if this is so, why are so many of these poems startling? Picasso said, “art is not truth,” and I know that to be true, but it is important to the force of these poems that I can believe that the poet is giving us his stories straight up.”
 
McKee was a longtime editor of the Painted Bride Quarterly. During his tenure, he edited three special issues, celebrating the work of Etheridge Knight and John Logan, as well as a retrospective, 20th-anniversary volume of the PBQ. He operated Banshee Press and edited the magazine One Trick Pony until its demise in 2007.

New ReBound title by Louis McKee

We’re proud to announce the forthcoming publication of No Matter by Louis McKee. Originally published by Pig in a Poke Press in 1987, this new edition features an introduction by Joseph Farley and is Number Five in our ReBound Series. Please join us in congratulating Lou & welcoming him to the Seven Kitchens family.

Official publication date: November 21, 2011 [125 copies]
ISBN-13: 978-0-9829396-7-3
27 pages; $ 7.00

ReBound Series is now open

We are now accepting submissions for the 2011 ReBound Series, which publishes out-of-print chapbooks in snazzy new editions. Current titles in the series are, in order of release, Notes from the Red Zone by Christina Pacosz, Ordinances by Naomi Lazard, Letter to Frank O’Hara by Steve Turtell, and Slow to Burn by Collin Kelley. Two additional titles will be released in November and December: No Matter by Louis McKee, and Midwinter Fires by Jeffery Beam.

Nominate a deserving chapbook today: full guidelines are here.

ReBound Series titles for 2011

Please join us in congratulating the winner of this year’s ReBound Chapbook Prize, Steve Turtell, for his chapbook Letter to Frank O’Hara (P & Q Press, 2000). Steve’s chapbook will be brought out in a fresh, new edition on February 14, 2011. (Yeah, we thought that would be a nice valentine to Frank O’Hara.) More news about Steve and his chapbook will be posted here on his author page.

We are triply excited to announce that three more titles in the ReBound Series will come out next year: Jeffrey Beam‘s Midwinter Fires (French Broad Press, 1990); Louis McKee‘s No Matter (Pig in a Poke Press, 1987); and Collin Kelley‘s Slow to Burn (MetroMania Press, 2006). [Click on author’s name for more details and updates as we move ahead.]

Congratulations to all four poets and deepest thanks to all who have supported this vital project by spreading the word, nominating outstanding chapbooks, and purchasing titles in this series. We couldn’t do it without you.